Charmed, I’m sure – My exclusive interview with Shannen Doherty

She made a name for herself in Beverly Hills, 90210 and Mallrats, but her work as Prue Halliwell on Charmed catapulted her to fame. As someone who has stayed in the film and television industry for over 30 years it would be easy to think that acting was Shannen’s dream come true. But the star is now pursuing other ventures and making a name for herself as an influential and active conservationist.

A long time animal-lover, Shannen has been an ongoing advocate for marine conservation, actively involving herself in the Tweet4Taiji campaign eventually leading to her involvement with the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society.

“I’ve always been a fan and a supporter of them, I watched Whale Wars religiously, I still think it’s the best show on TV.”

“I was really vocal on Twitter and they [the Sea Shepherd] started following me and they got in contact with me and then I sat down and met with Farrah and spoke to Lisa…and really discussed how I felt about them, how they felt about me…and we’ve just sort of built up this relationship, initially through Twitter and the passion I had for them”.

The Sea Shepherd has been at the forefront of many campaigns including the Taiji dolphins but most recently here in Australia they have been a driving force at stopping the controversial Western Australian shark cull, a cause Shannen herself has been following very closely, praising the efforts of the group.

“They’re pretty relentless in what they’re about. They’re courageous and they’re heroes and they put themselves in danger, they did in Japan with the whaling, I mean we all know what happened, they’re a small boat, they’ve constantly gotten thrown in jail…”

“The issue is an international issue…the whales don’t belong to any specific country…they’re all of ours, just like the sharks… just because they’re passing through the waters in Australia doesn’t mean that they’re Australia’s sharks.”

Shannen and her former co-star Holly Marie Combs were lucky enough to be invited out by the Sea Shepherd during their time in Western Australia, an experience Shannen will never forget.

“I was on Bruce the Rib this small boat just patrolling and it was amazing..

“It was a rough day out there sea-wise and I was right up there at the front of the boat because I didn’t want to miss a thing and we were jumping waves and  I would land and you would just hear me go “Eugh!” but with this grin on my face I loved it – I loved it, I loved it, I loved it.”

The recent marine-life violations that have been put in the media spotlight because of the efforts of groups like the Sea Shepherd has caused Shannen to question where society is going and what can be done to fix it, highlighting the importance of education and active involvement.

“Where we’re going is horrific. I’m not sure if it’s backwards, I don’t know if we’ve ever had this amount of cruelty in the world before…

“It’s like we are pounding our chests and saying ‘I am man and I can do anything’. Well you can’t and you’re destroying the world, you’re destroying the planet.”

“Whatever we can do to educate and bring awareness to something, is pretty amazing.”

“You know, sadly things come in go of what seems to be relevant for people to talk about –not that they come and go because they’ve stopped. I mean Taiji for example, it’s like a hot topic for 4 to 6 months and then when it’s not happening during the year people forget about it, they don’t realise that they’re still off harpooning the dolphins…It may not be the drive hunt into the Cove but they’re still doing it.”

The most recent hunt drive to Taiji was one that arguabley gave Shannen somewhat of an epiphany in terms of vocally expressing her passion and views.

“This last hunt drive in Taiji I kind of went ‘you know what? I’m tired of not being vocal’ and I’ve been a little hesitant I think to be vocal in my life because at one point in my life I was vocal politically and people got really upset with me and ostracised me…so I kind of decided to be quiet and now years and years later I thought ‘I have to fight for the things that I believe in’ regardless of how other people feel about it.”

As for her recent appointment to the advisory board of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, Shannen is already planning her next moves with a strong focus on friendly education and discussion on a global level.

“So my work with the Sea Shepherd basically it’s – I believe in them.”

“Everybody has a split personality, there’s the part of me that loves being an actor and then there’s that other side of me that wanted to be a photojournalist…now I find that I’m trying to live that life and I’m like ‘Okay, put me on the front lines’…

I think I’m still trying to figure that out myself what the next step is…

“We have to visit more countries, certainly I do, organise talks about it and have the right pamphlets. You also have to be careful that you don’t ostracise people because it’s not about pointing your finger and saying ‘you know, you’re wrong’.”

“It’s learning how to talk to people, it’s learning how to discuss it…and you know doing a lot more media and constantly discussing it on Twitter and Facebook”.

She is also planning a documentary TV show that will “bring all of that together” and hopefully highlight the important issues happening across the world.

“It would follow along the lines of nothing that’s out there, it would be much more travelling throughout and really looking at the different world issues and exploring them and exploring them from all sides but really coming from a conservationist point of view”.

Whatever Shannen’s next step is will presumably be one of great influence and importance for conservationism as a whole.

To read the full interview visit
https://ameliamcmahon01.wordpress.com/2014/04/07/shannen-doherty-interview-6-april-2014/

Shannen Doherty Interview 6 April 2014

shannen twitterWe’ve just seen a huge win with the Japanese Whaling decision over Japan’s alleged scientific research, what should the next legal step be for those hoping to end the WA Shark Cull? It is a national or international legal decision?

Well I mean, the issue is an international issue. You know I always say to people, you know the whales don’t belong to any specific country or to any specific race or anything, they’re all of ours, just like the sharks they’re not Australian, just because they’re passing through the waters in Australia doesn’t mean that they’re Australia’s sharks, nor are the dolphins Taiji. It’s something that every single country should be working hard to conserve. It’s the fact that we are going to wipe everything out if we’re not careful. And there really is no scientific research that needs to be done on whales, they’re not figuring anything out from it and the fact that meat is on streets being eaten at such a high mercury level is just devastating to me. There are so many other things that people can be doing to conserve, for instance, Holly showed me a thing from Peta today where if you didn’t have chicken for one day it would be like taking 500,000 cars off the road – and that’s just one day of the week. I mean it’s pretty crazy when you start realising stuff like that and it seems to me that people aren’t paying attention and we’re just destroying everything around us. So my work with Sea Shepherd basically it’s – I believe in them. They’re not protestors they’re conservationists. They’re pretty relentless in what they’re about. They’re courageous and they’re heroes and they put themselves in danger they did in Japan with the whaling I mean we all know what happened, they’re a small boat, they you know they’ve constantly gotten thrown in jail, been locked up, I mean all sorts of things. When the decision came down [Whaling decision], we were with Omar [Global Technical Director of Sea Shepherd] from the sea shepherd and he was just in shock. I mean, he – all of us – he didn’t think we’d win. Now it’s just policing it, now it’s just making sure that people respect that decision and that they don’t go to Norway or Iceland to start whaling there and you know again Sea Shepherd will be policing that it’s what they do.

How did you get involved with the Sea Shepherd?

It’s a recent thing, I was always a fan and a supporter of them, I watched Whale Wars religiously I still think it’s the best show on TV and I always kind of stepped back and admired them and then in this last hunt drive in Taiji I kind of went ‘you know what? I’m tired of not being vocal’ and I’ve been a little hesitant I think to be vocal in my life because at one point in my life I was vocal politically and people got really upset with me and ostracised me and everything else so I kind of decided to be quiet and now years and years later I thought I have to fight for the things that I believe in regardless of how other people feel about it. And so I was really vocal on my Twitter and they [The Sea Shepherd] started following me and they got in contact with me and then I sat down and met with Farrah and spoke to Lisa and like everybody and really discussed how I felt about them, how they felt about me, what our options could be, the things that I could do to help and we’ve just sort of built up this relationship, initially through Twitter and the passion I had for them. They’re an amazing group of people, they’re really reciprocal and really respond to people no matter who you are. They want to educate and that’s they’re big thing, to educate. A lot of people they’re not educated about these issues and what’s happening in the world. To me it’s amazing that so many of the youth in Japan have no idea about the slaughter and captivity is happening. So whatever we can do to educate and bring awareness to something, is pretty amazing.

You’ve mentioned education and raising awareness of all these issues, what is the next step in raising international awareness about the dolphins in Taiji, whaling, the WA Shark Cull. It’s a huge presence in social media – what is that next step?

You know I think I’m still trying to figure that out myself to be honest about what the next step is. We’ve been constantly talking about it, you know sadly things come in go of what seems to be relevant for people to talk about – not that they come and go because they’ve stopped. I mean Taiji for example, it’s like a hot topic for 4 to 6 months and then when it’s not happening during the year people forget about it, they don’t realise that they’re still off harpooning the dolphins, they’re still killing the dolphins. It may not be the drive hunt into the Cove but they’re still doing it. And it’s also like, if you’re only fighting for a couple of months out of the year how do you expect to evoke change? You can’t. So it’s something that you do – it’s pressure, it’s constant pressure. In evoking change in such an amazing country like Japan you really have to use outside pressure and that means that we all have to go to our embassies you know continue writing to our embassies and our president and environment minister. You know you have to write to basically anybody that you can, for us [Americans] it’s our congressman our senators it’s everybody to just the ambassadors, organise friendly peaceful protest and Sea Shepherd and myself for educating people more about it, we have to visit more countries, certainly I do, organise talks about it and have the right pamphlets. You also have to be careful that you don’t ostracise people because it’s not about pointing your finger and saying ‘you know, you’re wrong’. I don’t think Japan is an awful place, I think Japan is an amazing place but I think that what this small little fishing village is doing is a horrible, horrible thing. So you have to be careful in the way that you present things because you don’t want to get people so defensive that they stick up for a cause that they really don’t believe in so that’s sort of in the education it’s learning how to talk to people, it’s learning how to discuss it, it’s visiting more countries and you know doing a lot more media and constantly discussing it on Twitter and Facebook. Social media is an amazing thing; it gives us such a great platform so it’s really using all of that and I’m trying to get a documentary TV show right now that will bring all of that together and use all of that.

Will that documentary follow along the lines of something like ‘Blackfish’ that has brought about some change just from looking at the decline in profits of SeaWorld?

I think it would follow along the lines of nothing that’s out there, it would be much more travelling throughout and really looking at the different world issues and exploring them and exploring them from all sides but really coming from a conservationist point of view.

What are any specific plans that you’re hoping to pursue now that you’ve been appointed to the advisory board of the Sea Shepherd?

Probably my very first thing –being involved with the Sea Shepherd, period – is getting more boat time. The thing is what they do is so amazing that you feel like you could never do enough, I can’t take 6 months out to go on a boat or to be in Taiji, I have to work, I have a family to support so it’s hard, it’s a balance. But I think that sitting on the advisory board – you know they actually just emailed me about when the first meeting would be and I’m like ‘ooo! What part do I get to play?’ You know I think I’m trying to relive the youth that –I mean everybody has a split personality, there’s the part of me that loves being an actor and then there’s that other side of me that wanted to be a photojournalist and be, you know, in danger and do all of those sorts of things. And now I find that I’m trying to live that life and I’m like ‘Okay, put me on the front lines’. So I don’t really know yet. I think it’s advising them probably more on how you handle media and how you put yourself out there in a positive way and again, like I said, making sure you don’t ostracise and that the people that are speaking out about it are speaking out in the right way. To me, that’s really important because you could have like 20 celebrities supporting a cause but if 19 of them aren’t really saying the right thing and are kind of half-assed in it, it takes away. So it’s really about finding those people that are passionate and have the words to express it eloquently and again without making anybody else defensive.

How was your experience on the Sea Shepherd?

I was on Bruce The Rib this small boat just patrolling and it was amazing, the sound effects were the funniest because it was a rough day out there sea-wise and I was right up there at the front of the boat because I didn’t want to miss a thing and we were jumping waves and I would land and you would just hear me go “eugh!” but with this grin on my face I loved it – I loved it, I loved it, I loved it. It was pretty funny to be out there and see the fishery boat following us and videoing us and like, what are we going to do, you know, really? That’s what you’re doing right now? But it was amazing it felt like I was actively doing something which to me is always the most important thing to be actively be a part of something – it doesn’t have to be Sea Shepherd, there’s the dolphin project, there’s a lot of organisations out there that do good, it’s finding something that you believe in and that you’re passionate about because the only way to see change in this world is to follow your passion and to give 100% because if people just stand by and watch, nothing’s ever going to get done.

Do you feel that from the recent acts of cruelty we are seeing, like Taiji, the Blackfish documentary, introducing a Shark Cull, do you feel like we’re going backwards as a society?

I don’t know if we’re going backwards, but where we’re going is horrific. I’m not sure if it’s backwards, I don’t know if we’ve ever had this amount of cruelty in the world before, I feel like we’re just getting so bad, it’s so mindless. It’s like we are pounding our chests and saying ‘I am man and I can do anything’. Well, you can’t and you’re destroying the world, you’re destroying the planet, there’s going to be absolutely nothing left here. There’s the whole argument about Sea World, I understand both sides, I understand that for some people, they get to see these animals, they get to see their beauty which makes them appreciate them but they’re not in their natural habitat, they’re not meant to be performing. I mean training these Orca’s it’s so awful. And the inbreeding that’s happening within the programs, like why would you breed from an Orca with an aggressive personality and that’s the other thing, they knew. You know there are really great programs out there where they, the animals that are going extinct, they basically bring them back through a breeding program and they teach them how to be out in the wild and they release them and that’s the way it should be done. We humans should not be making money from animals, that are far smarter than we, to perform for us. I just think we’re getting progressively, progressively worse, again, I don’t know if it’s backwards I just know that the future is looking bleak unless more people join organisations like Sea Shepherd. We need more protests, and actors and musicians who have big voices, like stop performing at places like Sea World – boycott. Boycott a place if they’re not doing something that you want, I mean personally I think circuses are horrific, the poor elephants who are incredibly smart and emotional, they get loose on the streets and their solution is to shoot them dead. All of it is bizarre to me, we’ve taken these wild animals – they’re wild, they should be in the wild – and with the shark cull, you know what you’re getting yourself into. I was a surfer for a very, very, very long time and I knew that I was there with sharks, that was the chance that I was taking, it’s not the shark’s fault if they encounter my leg, that’s part of them, really there’s a bigger chance of being hit by a bus than being eaten by a shark – even here in Australia. There are also way better methods to protect people in the water, there’s much better methods than stringing lines up and having them suffer and die, it’s a horrible, horrible idea. Same as whaling and the Taiji, that to me is one of the most sickening ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AFL mourns loss of Dean Bailey

dean baileyAdelaide Crows’ assistant coach Dean Bailey has died after a short battle with lung cancer.

Bailey, 47, died Tuesday morning after being hospitalised for most of the past four months.

Adelaide players and staff were called to their West Lakes clubroom on Tuesday morning to receive the news.

In a statement released by Crows’ CEO Steven Trigg, he said what a monumental loss Bailey’s death was for his family and the AFL.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with Dean’s wife, Caron, and children, Darcy and Mitchell,” said Trigg.

“We’ve lost someone who’s had a profound impact on so many places and so many people – that it just adds to the terrible sadness we’re all feeling at this point in time.”

Trigg spoke of Bailey’s contribution to the Adelaide Crows and the AFL.

“You all know, and I’m sure, deeply respect the contribution that Dean has had on our game, across three states and a number of clubs.

“For our club, Dean very quickly established himself as a really genuine mentor and educator,” he said.

Trigg spoke highly of Bailey’s understanding of both players and the game.

“He was a great developer of players – both as footballers and young men.

“He had an extraordinary capacity to be intuitive about players’ needs and their emotions and about the way we should play the game,” he said.

Bailey had a distinguished career in both the VFL and the AFL.

His professional career began after he was recruited by Essendon from North Ringwood in 1986.

After playing with Essendon until 1992, Bailey spent three years at SANFL club Glenelg Tigers.

Bailey then spent three years coaching in Queensland before returning to Essendon in 1998 as a development coach, helping the club claim the 2000 Premiership.

In 2002 Bailey joined the Port Adelaide Football Club as an assistant coach, a position he held during Port’s 2004 premiership season.

At the end of 2007, Bailey was appointed as the senior coach of Melbourne for the 2008 season.

Bailey coached at Melbourne until Round 19 in the 2011 season, after which he joined the Adelaide Crows as a development coach in October that year.

Adelaide Captain Nathan van Berlo said the team was “shattered” by the loss.

“It was a massive shock for the group this morning.

“He brought a great deal of energy to the group… He had a great mind for football,” van Berlo said.

Crows players and coaches recently shaved their heads in a show of support for Bailey’s cancer battle.

Originally posted on On The Record

http://www.ontherecord-unisa.com.au/?p=5863

 

Bullet For My Valentine Review

BFMVWith the cold weather comes the flu and colds, but on September 7th Adelaide was gripped by the fever.Bullet for my Valentine Fever, that is.

After the long wait in the unforgiving Adelaide weather, eager fans were finally let loose in the Thebarton Theatre. The first performance of the night was from Canadian act, Cancer Bats. The technical difficulties the band faced two days prior in Perth seemed to be a thing of the past, and they burst onto the stage, starting a circle pit halfway through their first song.

As their set progressed, the punters were a mix of loyal fans and some new ones, proud to be putting their hands in the air and showing off the rock sign. They continued their set with songs including Darkness Livesand Lucifer’s Rocking Chair with their first small circle pit turning into one that consumed half of the mosh pit. The true metal fans were in for a treat, or not, when Cancer Bats concluded their set with a cover of Beastie Boy’s Sabotage .

After a short intermission, it was time for the second act of the night – Bring Me The Horizon . The band graced the stage with a banner of their latest album’s cover in the background, hanging proud. The cheers that greeted the band on their arrival would have had any mere spectator thinking this was the main band. They began their set with their latest single It Never Ends .

Bring Me The Horizon continued their set which consisted songs with ‘lyrics’ only die-hard fans might comprehend. However there appeared to be plenty of these die-hard fans when the venue became engulfed in circle pits and walls of death for the remainder of their set.

When fan-favourite Diamonds Aren’t Forever began, if you weren’t safely pressed against the wall or seated, you were covered in running black eyeliner, and not necessarily your own. Football Season’s Over and Sleep With One Eye Open were a few more crowd-pleasers played in their set and, despite the cliché request of front man, Ollie Sykes , asking the crowd to raise their middle fingers in the air and his attempts to create multiple walls of deaths, the faithful fans did not seem to mind.

Bring Me The Horizon concluded their set with Chelsea Smile and left the crowd with bruises, cuts and some without shoes. Just another night in a typical teen-angst mosh pit.

Another short intermission followed at the end of Bring Me The Horizon’s set but the tension and excitement continued to build. When the house lights went down and the classic melody of Old Fortuna started playing, it was time to rock. Without the request of the band, nearly all audience members raised their hands in the air giving Bullet For My Valentine a rock salute.

Bullet For My Valentine kicked off their show with Your Betrayal and had the punters weakening the floorboards of the Thebbie with their more than enthusiastic moshing skills.

They continued to belt out tunes including Fever and Waking the Demon . The slightly exaggerated guitar solos and the colourful lighting effects only added to the atmosphere of this faithful crowd. Bullet For My Valentine paid to tribute some of their older songs and ballads by playing Tears Don’t Fall.

Bullet For My Valentine had the crowd eating out of the palm of their hand and could not have had a better response when they announced they would be at next year’s Soundwave . If their sold-out show wasn’t enough proof, Bullet For My Valentine’s popularity is, for better or for worse, on the rise and is sure to continue with the recent release of their album Fever .

Originally posted on FasterLouder: http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/reviews/events/25569/Bullet-For-My-Valentine-Thebarton-Theatre-Adelaide-070910

Short Stack Review

short stackShort Stack is definitely the new black. A sold out crowd consisting of young children, around the age of 8, accompanied by their parents and the swarms of excited teenagers, braved the cold Adelaide weather and lined the streets early to see Australia’s new hottest band, Short Stack, at The Gov.

Adelaide band, Amber Calling, kicked off the night and had the punters screaming and asking for more. The crowd was made of some old, religious fans and definitely some new ones. The energy continued to increase as Amber Calling continued with their performance, even some of the not so enthusiastic parents seemed to enjoy the cover of Nothing At All. At the end of their set, they finished with Down And Out.

Sydney band, My Future Lies, were next to perform and began their small set with Penny Lane. The crowd was calmer during this set however; My Future Lies seemed to please most of them with just a few enjoyble songs.

The third act of the night was Brisbane boys, Ellington. They opened with their famous song, Wide Awake and Smiling, definitely pleasing the many fans in the audience. The crowd was, once again, calm and mellow but began to warm up to Ellington. Towards the end of their set, the crowd was pumped and definitely ready for Short Stack. After their last song, the – œShort Stack’ chants began almost immediately.

After the long anticipated wait, Short Stack finally took to the stage, opening with fan favourite Drop Dead Gorgeous. From the second the band took the stage, it was rather obvious that this crowd was ready to party!

An excellent cover of Blink 182’s First Date was to follow their opening songs, a cover sure to have impressed all fans. Next song on the set, to slow things down, was Back Of My Head. During this song just about every person in the room was gazing up at this amazing young talent. Next song on the set was the more lively song, One Step Closer, during which beach balls were thrown around in the audience, all in good fun. One Step Closer was then followed by It’s 4 You.

After, Adelaide fans were given the chance to show off their dancing skills to Short Stack’s cover of Nutbush City Limits. Some interesting dance moves were on display however surely some people must have impressed the band. The lyrics to their second hit single, Princess, was known and sung by every member of the crowd. Princess was shortly followed by Bradie’s impressive drum solo that had fans screaming for more. Lead singer, Shaun, and bass player, Andy, returned to the stage and performed another cover, this time legendary rock-band Queen’s classic hit, We Will Rock You. And they certainly did.

Shimmy A Go Go, the band’s first hit song, was the song that broke the barrier on the already crazy atmosphere. To say this song brought down the house would be an understatement. Shimmy A Go Go was to be the final song for the evening, however the “Encore” and “Short Stack” chants were seemingly too hard to ignore. Short Stack’s final song of the night was their third hit single, Sway Sway Baby.

Short Stack certainly live up to their hype as “Australia’s most new and energetic rock band” and have definitely proved they are not just another run-of-the-mill boy band. More great things are sure to follow the release of their debut album, Stack Is The New Black.

Originally published on FasterLouder:

http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/reviews/events/19481/Short-Stack-The-Governor-Hindmarsh-Adelaide-170709

Differentiating Journalism from Other Media

warThis essay presents an analysis on what differentiates journalism from other parts of the media and communications industry. Social media, public relations and talkback radio will be examined to demonstrate the differences of journalism to other media. To understand what differentiates journalism from these other forms of media one must first understand what journalism is and this will be discussed in the essay.

Journalism is not an easy thing to define and many complex definitions exist. Some have described it as ‘a hybrid, interdisciplinary mix of the humanities and the social sciences’ (Reece, 1999, p.72) whilst others have said it is

a vernacular form of literature, an imaginative practice that emerged at a given historical moment…in relationship to the growth of literacy and above all, the social movement of republican democracy (Carey, in McKnight 2000, p.17).

And ‘it helps us make sense of our world by developing our understanding, learning and intuition’ (Lamble, 2011, p.4). The definitions shown above and many others highlight the five most common roles of journalism, one of these being to act as a mirror reflecting a society to itself and ultimately both the good and the bad (Lamble, 2011, p. 35). Another is to help keep influential and powerful individuals and institutions honest and accountable by exposing them to the sometimes harsh light of public scrutiny (Lamble, 2011, p.35). Journalism also plays the role of an advocate ‘for the good of society by providing a voice…for individuals who have not been able to attain redress or have wrongs righted in other ways’ (Lamble, 2011, p.35). Journalists and news media also have a role to ‘protect and promote democracy and democratic ideals’ (Lamble, 2011, p.35) and, finally, to provide an ‘essential function in telling people in one part of the world what is happening the rest of the world’ (Lamble, 2011, p.35).  Journalism has a ‘code’ of ethics, with some countries having several organisations outlining what these ethics are. In Australia, these ethics are outlined by the Media Alliance’s Code of Ethics, and reflect the values emphasised in the profession of journalism. The code states that the ‘respect for truth and the public’s right to information’ are the ‘fundamental principles of journalism’ (Media Alliance, 2013). Journalists must ‘fulfill their public responsibilities’ (Media Alliance, 2013) with an obligation to reporting with honesty, fairness, independence and respect for other’s rights (Media Alliance, 2013). With these roles of journalism and the ethics within journalism outlined, the differences between journalism and other media is now discussed.

Social media is the most innovative ‘other media’ that differs from journalism. The most common, well-known forms of social media include Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, MySpace and Pinterest. Although social media and journalism are both ‘about communication’ (Lipscomb, 2010, Dental Economics), the ethics and values in journalism differentiate it from social media.

Social media enables everyone to have a voice, and share their thoughts and opinions through an array of media…individuals now rely more than ever on the Internet as their exclusive source of information (Lipscomb, 2010, Dental Economics).

As Lamble (2011, p.35) discusses, journalists provide a voice for those who are voiceless, however journalists, generally, provide this voice in an unbiased way. Social media, however, does not always do this. Social media allows for anyone with access to the interest to discuss their opinions on any topic. In recent years, there have been social media phenomenons that have gained a huge global audience but have presented a biased perception on an event or issue. One of those phenomenons, was the 2012 campaign by Invisible Children to raise awareness of child soldiers, specifically those involved in the Lord’s Resistance Army in the Democratic Republic of Congo, under the criminal leadership of Joseph Kony. The large, viral campaign faced criticism for its support of Ugandan military forces that have in the past been corrupt (Trent, 2012). This created much criticism of the organisation and campaign as well as social media in general, for not presenting an unbiased view of the issues facing Uganda and child soldiers. Some negative campaigns were made to encourage people not to support the charity as a protest to their bias, which is one reason why some believe that social media ‘really is an antisocial media’ (Chalmers in Hartcher, 2012). Journalists can also come under such harsh scrutiny for the presentation of issues, as social media did during the Joseph Kony campaign. This demonstrates that journalists should be concerned about journalistic standards in social media as the ethics of journalism are not yet inherent in social media but is currently being treated as such. However, by using the highest journalistic standards on social media, it will eventually be associated with these high standards (Briggs in Higgins, 2013). Therefore journalism differs from social media because of the ethics and standards in journalism that are not yet inherent or forced in social media.

Public relations is another form of ‘other media’ that is different to journalism. The principles of public relations include listening to the customer and conducting public relations as if the whole company depends on it (Huyse, 2006). The public relations profession sometimes collides with journalism as public relations uses media exposure to its advantage. However, the role of public relations does not always coincide with the ethics of journalism. Public relations as a profession exists to serve the client or company and promote their desired message. Falconi writes that public relations professionals ‘elaborate the opinions of her/his client/employer…to the point that [people] may perceive that, yes, all sides to the story have been covered and given an equal amount of relevance’ (2008). With this idea of promoting one person or company in the best possible way, this form of ‘other media’ clearly has different ethics to journalism and ultimately differs in both its purpose as well as its ethics. Experienced journalist and broadcaster, Caroline Jones (Jones for Lamble, 2011, p. 29) has discussed that because of the power of public relations ‘there are barriers now to jump over and…the manipulation of news is a real problem for journalists – manipulation of news by the public relations people’. Jones goes on to elaborate she does not ‘always feel that [she is] getting information from the horse’s mouth’. Therefore, due to the opposing principles and values of the two professions, it can be seen that whilst both professions are considered as part of the media, their principles make them vastly different due to the goals they are trying to achieve.

Talkback radio is also a form of ‘other media’ that differs to journalism. Radio is a form of journalism that has been present for many years. Due to the longevity of radio journalism, many have come to associate a majority of talkback radio programmes with journalism. However, this is not the case. With the introduction of talkback radio, sometimes known as ‘shock jock radio’ due to the controversial ways it discusses topics, journalism and the principles within journalism have become lost on these programmes. Talkback radio involves discussion on events, issues or any topics of interest. Everyone who has access to a phone, or sometimes the internet and an account on a social media site, is able to participate in talkback radio and ultimately voice their opinions. As discussed earlier, principles within journalism allow journalists to aim to give a voice to the voiceless, in an ethical manner. Talk radio differs as anyone can voice an opinion, talk radio hosts do not always serve to keep powerful individuals and companies honest and accountable nor do they have to promote democratic ideals, especially if their audience does not respect these ideals. This ultimately results in ‘a form of entertainment that mimics the forms and practices of journalism but which performs quite different social and political functions’ (Turner, 2009). As the Australian Journalism League has said, although the average Australian isn’t a journalist, they are directly affected by the quality of journalism they encounter (2012). This therefore reflects a need for the distinction between radio journalism and talkback radio in order to preserve the quality and longevity of journalism. Therefore, the ethics of journalism again demonstrate a great difference between journalism and other media, in this case talkback radio which has no governing ethics and is based solely on commercial gain and targeting an audience.

In conclusion, this essay has demonstrated that journalism differs to other forms of media including social media, public relations and talkback radio. The ethics, principles and values of journalism differ greatly to those of social media, public relations and talkback radio, with journalism aiming to be objective and neutral instead of voicing opinions, often in biased ways, and marketing something in the best possible way, emphasising the importance of journalism as a separate entity in the media industry.

References

Australian Journalism League, 2012, ‘Australian Journalism League on Talkback Radio’, Australian Journalism League, 25 October, viewed 1 April 2013 <http://australianjournalismleague.wordpress.com/2012/10/25/australian-journalism-league-on-talkback-radio/>

Falconi, T.M. 2008,‘Objectivity in public relations and journalism: essential for the credibility of both professions, and for different reasons’, PRConversations, viewed 30 March 2013, >http://www.prconversations.com/index.php/2008/01/objectivity-in-public-relations-and-journalism-essential-for-the-credibility-of-both-professions-and-for-different-reasons/>

Hartcher, P 2013, ‘Social media shows its bias’, The Sydney Morning Herald, viewed 30 March 2013, < http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/social-media-shows-its-bias-20121213-2bcmc.html>

Higgins, C 2013, ‘Is it journalism, or is it social media?’, Flip The Media, viewed 2 April 2013, < http://flipthemedia.com/2013/03/is-it-journalism-or-is-it-social-media/>

Huyse, K 2006, ‘Six Principles of Public Relations: But First Develop a Spine’, Zoetica, 7 July, viewed 29 March 2013, <http://www.zoeticamedia.com/six-principles-of-public-relations-but-first-develop-a-spine>

Lamble, S 2011, News As It Happens, Oxford University Press,Victoria.

Lipscomb, J 2010, ‘What is social media?’, Dental Economics, Vol. 100, Issue 4, p. 1.

McKnight, D. 2000, ‘Scholarship, research and journalism’, Australian Journalism Review, 22 (2), pp. 17-22.

Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, 2013, ‘Media Alliance Code of Ethics’, Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, viewed 29 March 2013, >http://www.alliance.org.au/code-of-ethics.html>

Reece, Stephen, D. 1999, ‘The Progressive Potential of Journalism Education: Recasting the Academic versus Professional Debate’, The Harvard International Journal of Press Politics 4.4, pp.70-94.

Turner, G 2009, ‘Politics, radio and journalism in Australia: The influence of talkback’, Journalism, 10 4: 411-430

2012, ‘KONY 2012: Phenomenon or Fraud?’, blog post, Trentobento, March 8 2012, viewed 29 March 2013, < http://trentobento.wordpress.com/2012/03/08/kony-2012-phenomenon-or-fraud/>

Bibliography

Australian Journalism League, 2012, ‘Australian Journalism League on Talkback Radio’, Australian Journalism League, 25 October, viewed 1 April 2013 <http://australianjournalismleague.wordpress.com/2012/10/25/australian-journalism-league-on-talkback-radio/>

Falconi, T.M. 2008,‘Objectivity in public relations and journalism: essential for the credibility of both professions, and for different reasons’, PRConversations, viewed 30 March 2013, >http://www.prconversations.com/index.php/2008/01/objectivity-in-public-relations-and-journalism-essential-for-the-credibility-of-both-professions-and-for-different-reasons/>

Hartcher, P 2013, ‘Social media shows its bias’, The Sydney Morning Herald, viewed 30 March 2013, < http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/social-media-shows-its-bias-20121213-2bcmc.html>

Higgins, C 2013, ‘Is it journalism, or is it social media?’, Flip The Media, viewed 2 March 2013, < http://flipthemedia.com/2013/03/is-it-journalism-or-is-it-social-media/>

Huyse, K 2006, ‘Six Principles of Public Relations: But First Develop a Spine’, Zoetica, 7 July, viewed 29 March 2013, <http://www.zoeticamedia.com/six-principles-of-public-relations-but-first-develop-a-spine>

Lamble, S 2011, News As It Happens, Oxford University Press,Victoria.

Lipscomb, J 2010, ‘What is social media?’, Dental Economics, Vol. 100, Issue 4, p. 1.

McKnight, D. 2000, ‘Scholarship, research and journalism’, Australian Journalism Review, 22 (2), pp. 17-22.

Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, 2013, ‘Media Alliance Code of Ethics’, Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, viewed 29 March 2013, >http://www.alliance.org.au/code-of-ethics.html>

Reece, Stephen, D. 1999, ‘The Progressive Potential of Journalism Education: Recasting the Academic versus Professional Debate’, The Harvard International Journal of Press Politics 4.4, pp.70-94.

‘Socialbakers: All Social Statistics’, Socialbakers, 2013, viewed March 29 2013, < http://www.socialbakers.com/all-social-media-stats/facebook/>

Thornton, T 2013, ‘Terri Thornton on Social Media’, OurBlook, viewed 30 March 2013, <http://www.ourblook.com/Social-Media/Terri-Thornton-on-Social-Media.html>

Turner, G 2009, ‘Politics, radio and journalism in Australia: The influence of talkback’, Journalism, 10 4: 411-430

Vallone, R. P. and Ross L and Lepper M. R. 1985, The Hostile Media Phenomenon: Biased Perception and Perceptions of Media Bias in Coverage of the Beirut Massacre, Attitudes and social cognition, viewed 30 March 2013, <http://www.zaxistv.com/sociology/popular%20culture/BiasedPerceptionofMediaBias.pdf>

2012, ‘KONY 2012: Phenomenon or Fraud?’, blog post, Trentobento, March 8 2012, viewed 29 March 2013, < http://trentobento.wordpress.com/2012/03/08/kony-2012-phenomenon-or-fraud/>

Discussion on the importance of National and local news

newsNational and local news is becoming less important in a world characterised by the almost instantaneous circulation of information. Discuss.

This essay will discuss national and local news and its importance in a world characterised by the instantaneous circulation of information. The essay will analyse the concepts of globalisation, global media, national media and local news and the issues involved within these concepts.

Global media and the concept of globalisation are key concepts that help highlight the importance of national and local news in societies with access to instant circulation of news and information. Globalisation in regards to news and the media has been defined as ‘the product of a changing economic and political order, one in which technology and capital have combined in a new multi-faceted imperialism’ (Silverstone, 1999, p 107) and that it ‘refers to the rapidly developing process of complex interconnections between societies, cultures, institutions and individuals world-wide’ (Tomlinson, 1999, p 165). From these definitions it can be seen that, through electronic media, there has been a strong development in the demand for political, cultural and economic stories from other parts of the world. Such stories have developed an ‘interconnectedness’ (Hjavard, 2003) between people of different societies. Often these stories are primarily about conflict and prominence, be it war struggles or political conflict, or high-profile personalities. These stories tend to be discussed at a global level because they capture the public’s interest both quickly and on a large scale. The discussion of such stories has led some to believe that a ‘global sphere’ has developed (Hjavard, 2003). This ‘global sphere’(Hjavard, 2003) is made up of a public that has a transnational opinion which can be quite powerful in causing national change at a national level. In the past we have seen various campaigns both reported and supported by the media that have resulted in important change at a national level because of an overwhelming transnational opinion. Some of these campaigns have included the Kony 2012 campaign and various People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) campaigns. In the case of the Kony campaign, a non-government organisation created a film about the need to capture war criminal, Joseph Kony. Although the film was intended for a United States audience, the film went viral and the global public opinion on the issue led to national change in the United States. ‘The U.S…played a pivotal role in providing equipment, intelligence and training’ (Besliu, Yu, 2012) to the governments of Africa, Uganda, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Not only this, but the ‘U.S. government was demonstrating its commitment to U.S. citizens’ at a political level (Besliu, Yu, 2012). In other campaigns, such as PETA’s ‘Anti-Skins’ and ‘Fur Is Dead’ campaign, multiple fashion designers based in various Western countries banned the use of fur in their designs including ‘Ralph Lauren and Tom Hilfiger’ (PETA, 2013). From these campaigns it can be seen that in societies characterised by instantaneous circulation of information, a global public opinion has become important in shaping change at a national level. Whilst this global sphere and global media has been influential and powerful in political, cultural and environmental instances, it has not made national or local news less important due to factors that will be discussed below.

 

National news and media is still important in a world characterised by the instantaneous circulation of information due to its key features. National media encompasses new and traditional media outlets, including newspapers, television, radio and online papers. Despite the growth of a global media, through the dominance of global media powerhouses including NewsCorp, BBC and CNN, national media is still important to the public, particularly political affairs within the nation. As such, national states are still influential in shaping media systems because, typically, they encompass that nation’s culture and traditions and allows other media systems to assess the successful key components in that nation. Professors like Stig Hjarvard (2003) have discussed the power of the concentration and monopolisation of Western media ownership but have still concluded that

 global media like CNN and BBC World may technically have a near global reach, but the actual audience figures tell quite a different story. Compared to the consumption of nationally based media, that of CNN and BBC World is very limited. (Hjavard, 2003)

Professionals have come to the same conclusion as Hjavard because ‘Opinion formation is still very much tied to the level of national political institutions thus not less important.’ (Hjavard, 2003) because ‘In most countries, these channels [CNN, BBC] are only used as a supplement to the national news media diet’ (Hjavard, 2003). From these conclusions it can be seen that the proximity and impact of news stories is the overriding factor in national media coverage, factors that ultimately appeal to national audiences because, like local news which will be discussed further in this essay, it can directly and subtly highlight how the audience is directly affected by it. This is because whilst ‘the routine, day-to-day decisions and actions related to international politics may often receive news coverage…rarely do they’ (Hjavard, 2003) have an impact on a large national audience. Therefore, key factors of national news, like impact and proximity and effects of stories, highlight the importance that national news still holds, despite the growth of global media.

 

Localisation is a concept that shows the importance of local news in a world characterised by the instantaneous circulation of information. Localisation has been defined as ‘the process of adapting a product or service to a particular language, culture, and desired local “look-and-feel”’ (SearchCIO – TechTarget, 2013). Journalism professionals have also said when discussing localisation in journalistic terms ‘scan globally, reinvent locally’(Zac, 2013). Therefore when applying these definitions to news and media it can be seen that localisation is a process of adapting news, from either a global or national level, and making it local, whether this is by highlighting connections, explaining the effects of a global or national issue or discussing local interests. Often global stories that are adapted into local stories are economic, political, legal or those about high-profile people with a connection the specific local place. The views on such stories presented from a local perspective are often more popular and well received by the public due to the fact that the audience does not believe the local media are primarily concerned with profit over content (McChesney, 2001). Not only this, but the local media is able to present the story and make the content focus on their culture or values. Hjavard (2003) discussed that the European media is an example of the strength of localisation. Hjavard (2003) emphasised that ‘both language and culture are factors working against Europeanization’. This is because Europe ‘exhibits a wide and diverse pattern of languages, cultures…[and] political practices’ (Hjavard, 2003) and also because when stories are presented as globalised stories rather than localised stories, the ‘concept of deterritorialization’ (Hjavard, 2003) is presented because the story does not demonstrate how it relates to the audience or affects them. Such concepts emphasise the importance of the local media in all countries, be it Europe or Australia, as the audience is primarily concerned with the impact of the story. In recent times, the financial struggles in Greece and other parts of Europe was of great interest in Australia as it was directly affecting local Australian businesses and trade as well as Australian and global finances. Therefore it can be seen through the concept of localisation, local news is still of great importance because it highlights the interests, culture, values, as well as its affect, on the local audience.

National and local news is not less important is a world characterised by the almost instantaneous circulation of information. The concepts of global media, globalisation, localisation and the key factors within national media have demonstrated that national and local news still remains important. This is because whilst a global opinion can be powerful and can force changes at national level, not every national issue is given the extensive, or correct, media coverage to create such powerful opinion. This then results in national and local news becoming the strongest outlets to educate and inform their audiences as they are able to demonstrate how a story affects them, bringing in the key factors of proximity and impact.

Reference List:

Besliu, R, Su Y. 2012, The Real Effects of Kony 2012 ,International Affairs Review, < http://www.iar-gwu.org/node/402>

Hjavard, S 2003, News Media and the Globalisation of the Public Sphere, Kommunication Forum, viewed 5 May 2013, > http://www.kommunikationsforum.dk/artikler/news-media-and-the-globalization-of-the-public-sphere<

McChesney, R 2001, Global Media, Neoliberalism & Imperialism, International Socialist Review, Viewed 12 March 2013, < http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/McChesney/GlobalMedia_Neoliberalism.html<

PETA 2013, PETA’s Anti-Skins Campaign: Keeping Skeletons Out of the Closet, PETA, Viewed 9 March 2013, >http://www.peta.org/about/learn-about-peta/skins-campaign.aspx<

SearchCIO – TechTarget 2013, Localization (l10n), SearchCIO – TechTarget, Viewed 10 March 2013, >http://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/localization<

Silverstone, R. 1999, Why Study the Media? London, Sage.

Tomlinson, J 1999, `Cultural globalization: placing and displacing the West’ in H. Mackay and T. O’Sullivan (eds) The Media Reader: Continuity and Transformation, London, Sage.

Zac, L (2013), Globalization and Localisation, COMM 1059, University of South Australia, Adelaide, 25 April.

Bibliography

Besliu, R, Su Y. 2012, The Real Effects of Kony 2012 ,International Affairs Review, < http://www.iar-gwu.org/node/402>

Hjavard, S 2003, News Media and the Globalisation of the Public Sphere, Kommunication Forum, viewed 5 March 2013, > http://www.kommunikationsforum.dk/artikler/news-media-and-the-globalization-of-the-public-sphere<

McChesney, R 2001, Global Media, Neoliberalism & Imperialism, International Socialist Review, Viewed 12 March 2013, < http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/McChesney/GlobalMedia_Neoliberalism.html<

PETA 2013, PETA’s Anti-Skins Campaign: Keeping Skeletons Out of the Closet, PETA, Viewed 9 March 2013, >http://www.peta.org/about/learn-about-peta/skins-campaign.aspx<

SearchCIO – TechTarget 2013, Localization (l10n), SearchCIO – TechTarget, Viewed 10 March 2013, >http://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/localization<

Silverstone, R 1999, Why Study the Media? London, Sage.

Tomlinson, J 1997, `Internationalism, globalization and cultural imperialism’ in Kenneth Thompson (ed.) Media and Cultural Regulation. London, Sage, Milton Keynes, Open University Press

Tomlinson, J 1999, `Cultural globalization: placing and displacing the West’ in H. Mackay and T. O’Sullivan (eds) The Media Reader: Continuity and Transformation, London, Sage.

Zac, L (2013), ‘Globalization and Localisation’, COMM 1059, University of South Australia, Adelaide, 25 April.

Wound Awareness Week looks at saving health dollars and patient’s suffering

WAWA new national study has shown that millions of health budget dollars and patient’s suffering could be spared through better access to compression therapy for leg ulcer patients.

The KPMG study unveiled yesterday at World Awareness Week showed that an economic cost savings of $166 million a year could be produced if all eligible patients with venous leg ulcers (VLU) were treated with compression bandages and stockings.

The high cost of compression items is currently preventing their widespread use, with most Australian patients being forced to pay for them personally.

Wound care professionals from the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) and their National President Dr. Bill McGuiness believe a government subsidy scheme is the best solution for the use of compression items.

“Compression bandages and stockings are an essential part of treatment for leg ulcers but they’re expensive and many patients can’t afford them, that’s why federal government subsidy for these items is absolutely vital”.

The AWMA has asked the Federal Government to consider the benefits highlighted in the KPMG report as part of this year’s budgetary planning process.

Dr. Bill McGuinness emphasised the financial benefits that compression therapy offers, as well as the benefits to patients and the public health system.

“These estimated savings [of $166 million] would flow from the faster healing times associated with compression therapy.

“Compression therapy is an essential component of VLU care, with most wounds healing within the benchmark time of 12 weeks, nearly twice as quickly as otherwise.

“This means less use of GPs, community care and hospitals, and a greatly reduced financial burden on the public health system”.

Dr McGuiness also stressed the importance of better thinking over health funding, highlighting that patients who are less well-off are suffering greatly from the health condition.

“Managing leg ulcers is an equity issue that needs addressing urgently. The less well-off are paying the price for a health condition that causes pain and discomfort, greatly restricts their mobility and creates distress and social isolation.

“We may not be in an environment for significant new health funding, but we have an urgent need for some smarter thinking on how precious health dollars are allocated and spent.”

Jesus Christ Superstar Review

jcsJesus Christ Superstar – or Judas Iscariot Superstar?

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s rock opera spectacular, Jesus Christ Superstar, was given new life by an impressive cast on the Adelaide leg of its Australian Tour.

Forty years after its Australian debut, the show has been re-vamped with hard to miss comparisons between social media, the US government and the 2011 Occupy movement.

The high-tech backdrop in this multimedia extravaganza was a continuous display of CCTV footage, social media ‘tweets’ and news headlines.  These elements gave a good background to the story and set the scene for Laurence Connor’s contemporary take on the show, whilst keeping all the songs and music from the original production.

Best known for his comedic music styling, Tim Minchin delivered an unforgettable performance as a haunting and thought-provoking Judas. Minchin showcased both his impressive vocal and acting skills, shining during his performance of ‘Blood Money’. He  also delivered an exciting and powerful performance of ‘Superstar’ accompanied by an erotic choir of angels.

Understudy Rory Taylor made his Australian debut in the production as Jesus, filling in for British actor and singer, Ben Forster.  Taylor was acknowledged for his fantastic vocal range with a standing ovation for his outstanding performance.

Former Spice Girl Melanie Chisolm dazzled the crowd as Mary Magdalene in her first ever Australian tour. Chisolm’s performance of ‘I don’t know how to love him’ was breathtaking, as was her entire performance, proving this Spice Girl has plenty more to offer in the world of musical theatre.

Deal or No Deal’s Andrew O’Keefe made his presence felt with his all-singing, all-dancing reality television host take on King Herod, not to mention his red crushed velvet suit. O’Keefe had just the one number, which managed to include a subtle ‘Booyeah!’, a popular move amongst the Deal or No Deal fans in the audience.

Without dialogue between songs, it may be hard for some to precisely follow the show at some points, but this is a minor issue.  With the impressive performances from all cast members, including Jesus Christ Superstar alumni Jon Stevens it is easy to see why multiple shows have been added to the Australian tour.

Jesus Christ Superstar continues its Australian tour with shows in Sydney and Melbourne, finishing on June 18  in Brisbane.

Published on OnTheRecord:
http://www.ontherecord-unisa.com.au/?p=5308